The Emergence of a Cognitive Risk Era

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The Emergence of a Cognitive Risk Era

Musings of a Cognitive Risk Manager

Traditional risk managers have conducted business the same way for most of the last 30 years even as technology has advanced beyond the ability to keep pace. Through each financial crisis risk management has been presented with many opportunities to change but instead resort to the same approach and inevitable outcomes. As competitive pressures grow boards expect executives do more with less pushing risk professionals to adopt creative new ways to add value.

Risks are more complex and systemic in a digital economy with the potential to amplify across disparate vectors critical to business performance. Social media is just one of the many new amplifiers of risks that must be incorporated into enterprise risk programs. Asymmetric risks, like Cyber risk, require a three-dimensional response that includes a deeper understanding of the complexity of the threat and simplicity of execution. The challenge of these more complex risks is even more daunting given the speed of business and distributed nature of data in an interconnected digital economy.

The WannaCrypt cyber attack is just another example of how human behavior has become the key amplifier of risks in a digital economy and an example of how situational awareness is part of the solution. There are many stories and opinions about the events and circumstances of the attack and more details will emerge over time. The truth is that the world got lucky because of the astute actions of one person whose quick actions unintentionally stopped the spread of the virus before broad damage could be done. No one should breathe a sigh of relief because now the attackers are aware of the mistake they made and will, no doubt, correct and learn new ways to exploit weaknesses more effectively. The real question is what did we learn?

The answer is it’s not clear, yet! What is clear is that cyber threats will continue to find ways to exploit the human element requiring new approaches to understand the risk and find new solutions. But I digress….

The purpose of these musings is to introduce the emergence of a cognitive era in risk and propose a path for adopting a human-centered strategy for addressing asymmetric complexity in enterprise risk. The themes I will present in a series of articles will be used to build a case for a supplemental approach in risk that incorporates an understanding of vulnerabilities at the human-machine interaction, human-factor design in internal controls; and, introduce new technologies to enhance performance in managing and reducing human judgment error for complex risks.

Technology has evolved from a tool designed to free up humans from manual work to the development of information networks creating knowledge workers from the boardrooms of Wall Street to the factory floor. The excess capital created by technology is now being reinvested in next generation tools for more advanced uses.

Innovations in machine learning, artificial intelligence and other smart technologies promise even greater opportunity for personal convenience and wealth creation. Risk professionals must begin to understand the methods used in these cognitive support tools in order to evaluate which ones work best to address complex risks. The emergence of smart technology in business applications is growing rapidly however the range of capability and outcomes vary widely for many solutions therefore an understanding of the limitations of each vendor’s predictive powers are important. Contrarily, the rapid advancement of technological innovation has also created a level of complexity that is contributing to the spread of risks in ways that are hard to imagine. It now appears that we are not connecting the dots between the inflection point of technology and human behavior. This is a complex discussion that requires a series of articles to fully unpack.

Risk professionals must begin to understand how human behavior contributes to risk as well as the vulnerabilities at the human – machine interaction. Human error is increasingly cited as the leading cause of risk events in cross industry data such as IT risk, healthcare, automotive, aeronautics and others. [i][ii][iii][iv][v] Unfortunately, risk strategies incorporating human-factors have been widely underrepresented in many risk programs to date. That may be changing! At the core of this change is one constant – humans! Risk professionals who combine “human factors” design with advanced analytical approaches and behavioral risk controls will be better positioned to bring real value to business strategy.

 

 

[i] https://media.scmagazine.com/documents/82/ibm_cyber_security_intelligenc_20450.pdf

[ii] https://www.nap.edu/read/9728/chapter/4

[iii] http://www.hse.gov.uk/humanfactors/topics/03humansrisk.pdf

[iv] http://www.cbsnews.com/news/medical-errors-now-3rd-leading-cause-of-death-in-u-s-study-suggests/

[v] https://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/rm/docs/hra.pdf

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