Tag Archives: James Bone

2018-02-20 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management Cognitive Hack: Trust, Deception and Blind Spots

When we think of hacking we think of a network being hacked remotely by a computer nerd sitting in a bedroom using code she’s written to steal personal data, money or just to see if it is possible. The idea of a character breaking network security to take control of law enforcement systems has been imprinted in our psyche from images portrayed in TV crime shows however the real story is much more complex and simple in execution.

The idea behind a cognitive hack is simple. Cognitive hack refers to the use of a computer or information system [social media, etc.] to launch a different kind of attack. The sole intent of a cognitive attack relies on its effectiveness to “change human users’ perceptions and corresponding behaviors in order to be successful.”[1] Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian operatives is an example of a cognitive hack taken to the extreme but demonstrates the effectiveness and subtleties of an attack of this nature.[2]

Mueller’s indictment of an elaborately organized and surprisingly low-cost “troll farm” set up to launch an “information warfare” operation to impact U.S. political elections from Russian soil using social medial platforms is extraordinary and dangerous. The danger of these attacks is only now becoming clear but it is also important to understand the simplicity of a cognitive hack. To be clear, the Russian attack is extraordinary in scope, purpose and effectiveness however these attacks happen every day for much more mundane purposes.

Most of us think of these attacks as email phishing campaigns designed to lure you to click on an unsuspecting link to gain access to your data. Russia’s attack is simply a more elaborate and audacious version to influence what we think, how we vote and foment dissent between political parties and the citizenry of a country. That is what makes Mueller’s detailed indictment even more shocking.[3] Consider for example how TV commercials, advertisers and, yes politicians, have been very effective at using “sound bites” to simplify their product story to appeal to certain target markets. The art of persuasion is a simple way to explain a cognitive hack which is an attack that is focused on the subconscious.

It is instructive to look at the Russian attack rationally from its [Russia’s] perspective in order to objectively consider how this threat can be deployed on a global scale. Instead of spending billions of dollars in a military arms race, countries are becoming armed with the ability to influence the citizens of a country for a few million dollars simply through information warfare. A new more advanced cadre of computer scientists are being groomed to defend and build security for and against these sophisticated attacks. This is simply an old trick disguised in 21st century technology through the use of the internet.

A new playbook has been refined to hack political campaigns and used effectively around the world as documented in an article March, 2016. For more than 10 years, elections in Latin America have become a testing ground for how to hack an election. The drama in the U.S. reads like one episode of a long running soap opera complete with “hackers for hire”, “middle-men”, political conspiracy and sovereign country interference.

“Only amateurs attack machines; professionals target people.”[4]

Now that we know the rules have changed what can be done about this form of cyber-attack? Academics, government researchers and law enforcement have studied this problem for decades but the general public is largely unaware of how pervasive the risk is and the threat it imposes on our society and the next generation of internet users.

I wrote a book, Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground in Cybersecurity…the Human Mind to chronicle this risk and proposed a cognitive risk framework to bring awareness to the problem. Much more is needed to raise awareness by every organization, government official and risk professionals around the world. A new cognitive risk framework is needed to better understand these threats, identify and assess new variants of the attack and develop contingencies rapidly.

Social media has unwittingly become a platform of choice for nation state hackers who can easily hide the identify of organizations and resources involved in these attacks. Social media platforms are largely unregulated and therefore are not required to verify the identity and source of funding to set up and operate these kinds of operations. This may change given the stakes involved.

Just as banks and other financial services firms are required to identify new account owners and their source of funding technology providers of social media sites may also be used as a venue for raising and laundering illicit funds to carry out fraud or attacks on a sovereign state. We now have explicit evidence of the threat this poses to emerging and mature democracies alike.

Regulation is not enough to address an attack this complex and existing training programs have proven to be ineffective. Traditional risk frameworks and security measures are not designed to deal with attacks of this nature. Fortunately, a handful of information security professionals are now considering how to implement new approaches to mitigate the risk of cognitive hacks. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is also working on an expansive new training program for information security specialists specifically designed to understand the human element of security yet the public is largely on its own. The knowledge gap is huge and the general public needs more than an easy to remember slogan.

A national debate is needed between industry leaders to tackle security. Silicon Valley and the tech industry, writ large, must also step up and play a leadership role in combatting these attacks by forming self-regulatory consortiums to deal with the diversity and proliferation of cyber threats through vulnerabilities in new technology launches and the development of more secure networking systems. The cost of cyber risk is far exceeding the rate of inflation and will eventually become a drag on corporate earnings and national growth rates as well. Businesses must look beyond the “insider threat” model of security risk and reconsider how the work environment contributes to risk exposure to cyberattacks.

Cognitive risks require a new mental model for understanding “trust” on the internet. Organizations must begin to develop new trust measures for doing business over the internet and with business partners. The idea of security must also be expanded to include more advanced risk assessment methodologies along with a redesign of the human-computer interaction to mitigate cognitive hacks.

Cognitive hacks are asymmetric in nature meaning that the downside of these attacks can significantly outweigh the benefits of risk-taking if not addressed in a timely manner. Because of the asymmetric nature of a cognitive hack attackers seek the easiest route to gain access. Email is one example of a low cost and very effective attack vector which seeks to leverage the digital footprint we leave on the internet.

Imagine a sandy beach where you leave footprints as you walk but instead of the tide erasing your footprints they remain forever present with bits of data about you all along the way. Web accounts, free Wi-Fi networks, mobile phone apps, shopping websites, etc. create a digital profile that may be more public than you realize. Now consider how your employee’s behavior on the internet during work connects back to this digital footprint and you are starting to get an idea of how simple it is for hackers to breach a network.

A cognitive risk framework begins with an assessment of Risk Perceptions related to cyber risks at different levels of the firm. The risk perceptions assessment creates a Cognitive Mapof the organization’s cyber awareness. This is called Cognitive Governance and is the first of five pillars to manage asymmetric risks. The other five pillars are driven from the findings in the cognitive map.

A cognitive map uncovers the blind spots we all experience when a situation at work or on the internet exceeds our experience with how to deal with it successfully. Natural blind spots are used by hackers to deceive us into changing one’s behavior to click a link, a video, a promotional ad or even what we read. Trust, deception and blind spots are just a few of the tools we must incorporate into a new toolkit called the cognitive risk framework.

There is little doubt that Mueller’s investigation into the sources and methods used by the Russians to influence the 2016 election will reveal more surprises but one thing is no longer in doubt…the Russians have a new cognitive weapon that is deniable but still traceable, for now. They are learning from Mueller’s findings and will get better.

Will we?

[1] http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/301.pdf

[2] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-17/mueller-deflates-trump-s-claim-that-russia-meddling-was-a-hoax

[3] https://www.scribd.com/document/371673084/Internet-Research-Agency-Indictment#from_embed

[4] https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2013/03/phishing_has_go.html

NIST


2017-10-05 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management CHOICE connect: Book review Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground in Cybersecurity..the Human Mind

Cognitive Hack addresses an area of cybersecurity that has not been vastly explored—the human element. Most cybersecurity authors focus on how technology can be used and/or adapted to make an enterprise’s infrastructure secure. Bone, a risk advisory consultant and an editor, aims “to introduce readers to the evolution of emerging technologies …” and to “address what some believe to be the weakest link in cybersecurity—the human mind.”

The author examines six distinct areas: understanding various vulnerabilities, exploring advances in situational awareness, “the cyber paradox,” the risk of relying solely on industry reports, delving into a hacker’s mind, and providing a “cognitive risk framework” for cybersecurity. In each of these topics, Bone uses real-world examples of security breaches and how the human element effected the severity of the breach. He also supplies ways the human element could have been mitigated in the breach, thus lessening the severity. In addition, Bone explains that cognitive hacking is in its infancy, and much work and research still needs to be completed. For those interested in the topic, he lists several areas where further research is needed.

–T. Farmer, Arkansas State University

Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, and professionals.

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The following review appeared in the October 2017 issue of CHOICE:

Information & Computer Science
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MARC
Bone, James. Cognitive hack: the new battleground in cybersecurity … the human mind. CRC Press, 2017. 181p bibl index ISBN 9781498749817, $79.95; ISBN 9781498749824 ebook, contact publisher for price.

To read more click link below:

http://www.choiceconnect.org/webclipping/204567/ps9t6uv2bs2847drk_dml53okau-aloq5l0x6tn7ad3407ih6m

 

2017-10-04 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management How to Design an Intelligent Organization

“Simplicity is the value proposition that should be expected from the implementation of modern technology solutions.” – James Bone, Executive Director, TheGRCBlueBook

“Intelligent Automation” is such a new term that you won’t find it in Wikipedia or Merriam-Webster. However, we are clearly in the early stages of a technological transformation that’s no less dramatic than the one spurred by the emergence of the Internet.

A new age in quantitative and empirical methods will change how businesses operate as well as the role of traditional finance professionals. To compete in this environment, finance teams must be willing to adopt new operating models that reduce costs and improve performance through better data. In short, a new framework is needed for designing an “intelligent organization.”

The convergence of technology and cognitive science provides finance professionals with powerful new tools to tackle complex problems with more certainty. Advanced analytics and automation will increasingly play bigger roles as tactical solutions to drive efficiency or to help executives solve complex problems.

But the real opportunities lie in reimaging the enterprise as intelligent organization — one designed to create situational awareness with tools capable of analyzing disparate data in real or near-real time.

Automation of redundant processes is only the first step. An intelligent organization strategically designs automation to connect disparate systems (e.g., data sources) by enabling users with tools to quickly respond or adjust to threats and opportunities in the business.

Situational awareness is the product of this design. In order to push decision-making deeper into the organization, line staff need the tools and information to respond to change in the business and the flexibility to adjust and mitigate problems within prescribed limits. Likewise, senior executives need near-real time data that provides the means to query performance across different lines of business with confidence and anticipate impacts to singular or enterprise events in order to avoid costly mistakes.

Financial reporting is becoming increasingly complex at the same time finance professionals are being challenged to manage emerging risks, reduce costs, and add value to strategic objectives. These competing mandates require new support tools that deliver intelligence and inspire greater confidence in the numbers.

James Bone

James Bone

Thankfully, a range of new automation tools is now available to help finance professionals achieve better outcomes against this dual mandate. However, to be successful finance executives need a new cognitive framework that anticipates the needs of staff and provides access to the right data in a resilient manner.

This cognitive framework provides finance with a design road map that includes human elements focused on how staff uses technology and simplifying the rollout and implementation of advanced analytical tools.

The framework is composed of five pillars, each designed to complement the others in the implementation of intelligent automation and the development of an intelligent organization:

  1. Cognitive governance
  2. Intentional control design
  3. Business intelligence
  4. Performance management
  5. Situational awareness

Cognitive governance is the driver of intelligent automation as a strategic tool in guiding organizational outcomes. The goal of cognitive governance, as the name implies, is to facilitate the design of intelligent automation to create actionable business intelligence, improve decision-making, and reduce manual processes that lead to poor or uncertain outcomes.

In other words, cognitive governance systematically identifies “blind spots” across the firm then directs intelligent automation to reduce or eliminate the blind spots.

The end game is to create situational awareness at multiple levels of the organization with better tools to understand risks, errors in judgment, and inefficient processes. Human error as a result of decision-making under uncertainty is increasingly recognized as the greatest risk to organizational success. Therefore, it is crucial for senior management create a systemic framework for reducing blind spots in a timely manner. Cognitive governance sets the tone and direction for the other four pillars.

Intentional control design, business intelligence, and performance management are tools for creating situational awareness in response to cognitive governance mandates. A cognitive framework does not require huge investments in the latest big data “shiny objects.” It’s not necessary to spend millions on machine learning or other forms of artificial intelligence. Alternative automation tools for simplifying operations are readily available today, as is access to advanced analytics, for organizations large and small, from a variety of cloud services.

However, for firms that want to use machine learning/AI, a cognitive framework easily integrates any widely used tool or regulatory risk framework. A cognitive framework is focused on a factor that others ignore: how humans interact with and use technology to get their work done most effectively.

Network complexity has been identified as a strategic bottleneck in response times for dealing with cybersecurity risks, cost of technology, and inflexibility in fast-paced business environments. Without a proper framework, improperly designed automation processes may simply add to infrastructure complexity.

There is also a dark side to machine learning/AI that organizations must understand in order to anticipate best use cases and avoid the inevitable missteps that will come with autonomous systems. Microsoft learned a hard lesson with “Clippy,” its Chatbot project, which was shelved when users taught the bot racist remarks. While there are many uses for AI, this technology is still in an experimental stage of growth.

Overly complicated approaches to intelligent automation are the leading cause of failed big data projects. Simplicity is the new value proposition that should be expected from the implementation of technology solutions. Intelligent automation is one tool to accomplish that goal, but execution requires a framework that understands how people use new technology effectively.

Simplicity must be a strategic design imperative based on a framework for creating situational awareness across the enterprise.

James Bone is a cognitive risk consultant; a lecturer at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies; founder of TheGRCBlueBook.com, an online directory of governance, risk, and compliance tools; and author of, “Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground in Cybersecurity … the Human Mind.”

How to Design an Intelligent Organization

To see the post in CFO magazine click the link above

2017-07-01 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management The Emergence of a Cognitive Risk Era: Intentional Control Design and Machine Learning: Creating Situational Awareness

In my previous articles, I introduced Human-Centered risk management and the role that Cognitive Risk Governance should play in designing the risk and control environment outcomes that you want to achieve.  One of the key outcomes was briefly described as situational awareness that includes the tools and ability to recognize and address risks in real time.  In this article, I will delve deeper into how to redesign the organization using cognitive tools while reimagining how risks will be managed in the future.  Before I explore “the how” let’s take a look at what is happening right now.

This concept is not some futuristic state!  On the contrary, this is happening in real-time.  BNY Mellon, one of the oldest firms on Wall Street has started a transformation to a cognitive risk governance environment.  Mellon is not the only Wall Street titan leading this charge.  JP Morgan, BlackRock, and Goldman Sachs are hiring Silicon Valley talent among others to transform banking, in part, to remain competitive and to strategically reduce costs, innovate and build scale not possible with human resources.  The banks have taken a very targeted approach to solve specific areas of opportunity within the firm and are seeking new ways to introduce innovation to customer service, new product development and create efficiencies that will have profound implications for risk, audit, compliance and IT now and in the foreseeable future

As these early stage projects expand the transformation that is taking place today will position these firms with competitive advantages few can anticipate.  I do not know the business plans of BNY Mellon, JP Morgan, BlackRock or Goldman Sachs but it is safe to say that each of these firms will see the benefits of implementing targeted solutions with smart systems to augment decision-making and drive growth.  They may also reduce risks in the process.  However, as these firms grow their smart technology portfolio it will become obvious that a strategic plan must include an overarching Cognitive Risk Governance program that goes deeper than IT efficiencies, investment management and one-off cost savings in contract reviews.  I applaud the approach these firms are taking but these are low-lying “tactical fruit”, but one must start somewhere!

The real question is what role will risk management, audit, and compliance play in this new cognitive risk era?  Will oversight functions continue to be observers of change or leaders in change with a risk framework that contemplates an enterprise approach to smart systems?  Will oversight functions seek opportunity in this new cognitive risk era or choose to ignore the growth of these advances?

The Cognitive Risk Framework for Enterprise Risk Management has been presented in earlier articles as a set of pillars that include human elements integrated with technology because technology alone is not enough!  Smart systems will reduce costs, in some cases, redundant staff and in other cases reduce the need to add people to build scale and more.  However, without a more comprehensive approach the limits of a technology-only strategy will become obvious as soon as the cost savings decline.

If firms truly want to create a multiplier effect of cost savings and scale the transformation must include technology that assists humans to become more productive!

If operational and residual risks represent the bulk of inefficient bottlenecks or have limited a firm’s ability to respond quickly to changes in the business environment a well-designed cognitive risk framework offers firms the ability to free up the back and middle office environment.  How so?

Introduction to Intentional Control Design, Machine Learning & Situational Awareness

First, automation trumps big data analytics!

I know that Big Data, Predictive Analytics, Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence sound sexy, seems cool and is the future!  But let’s work in the real world for a moment.  Google has made great advances in machine learning but if you actually take the time to read their research literature (since about 1% or less of the pundits do) you will find that the actual use cases have been limited.  The real opportunities involve routine processes with very large pools of data that is well defined.

You can’t teach a machine to be smart with dumb data

If you have unlimited resources or simply want to throw away money then start a Big Data project with unstructured, random data!  Some may argue the benefits of this approach but consider this.  Most firms produce petabytes of structured data every single day in production environments that are rarely leveraged to its full capacity.  Why not start with a good data source, automate the processes that produce this data to assist humans in getting their jobs done more efficiently?  Want to ensure internal controls work flawlessly? Automate them!  Want to ensure compliance with regulatory mandates? Automate it!  Want to produce real-time audit sampling and monitoring? Automate it!

Design the risk, compliance, IT and audit outcomes that you need!  Intentional Control Design takes advantage of machine learning in the most efficient manner through the corpus of data that exists in production data.

Once you do that you have your big data projects solved! Need audit data to test compliance? Done!  Need risk assessments with real data? Done!  Need to check fraudulent activity? Done!

If you want to create situational awareness for how your firm is operating in real time design it!  Automation trumps Big Data analytics, but most get this backwards!

Unstructured data requires human annotation, which increases costs exponentially so why start there?  It may not be sexy but the money that you save will make you feel better than the money you lose chasing the glamor projects that add little value.

Automation gives you situational awareness through true transparency!  Transparency gives the Board and senior management the ability to adjust in a more timely manner.  If you want a no surprise business environment consider designing one…….  It doesn’t happen by accident nor does it happen by threatening staff to not make mistakes!

Cars are safer today than 40 years ago because of design! Airline travel is safer today because of design.  Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Apple have overtaken traditional business models by design!

There are a number of residual benefits that I haven’t discussed in detail yet like reduction in cyber risks, employee burnout, increased staff productivity and many more.  I saved these for last because we always forget that humans are the real engines of business growth.

If you are still an unbeliever just take at look at the store closings in the retail industry by not listening to the change created by the internet and firms like Amazon.  I understand that change is hard but without change it will be harder to keep up and survive in an environment that moves in nanoseconds!

2017-01-10 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management A Contextual Model of a Cognitive Risk Framework for Enterprise Risk Management

Behavioral economics has only recently begun to garner gradual acceptance by mainstream economists as a rigorous discipline that may serve as an alternative perspective on decision-making. However, the broad acceptance and growing adoption of behavioral economic theories and concepts along with advancements in computational firepower present opportunities to put into practice practical applications for improving risk management practice. The goal of this article is to develop a contextual model of a cognitive risk framework for enterprise risk management that frames the limitations and possibilities for enhancing enterprise risk management by combining behavioral science with a more rigorous analytical approach to risk management. The thesis of this paper is that managers and staff are prone to natural limitations in Bayesian probability predictions as well as errors in judgment due in part of insufficient experience or data to draw reliably consistent conclusions with great confidence. In this context, a cognitive risk framework helps to recognize these limitations in judgment. The Cognitive Risk Framework for Cybersecurity and the Five Pillars of the framework have been offered as guides for developing an advanced enterprise risk framework to deal with complex and asymmetric risks such as cyber risks.

“A major task in organizing is to determine, first, where the knowledge is located that can provide the various kinds of factual premises that decisions require.” – Herbert Simon

Background:

In a 1998 critique of Amos Tversky’s contributions to behavioral economics (Laibson and Zeckhauser) discussed how Tversky systematically exposed the theoretical flaws in rationality by individual actors in the pursuit of perfect optimality. Tversky and Kahneman’s Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases (1974) and Prospect Theory (1979) demonstrated that actual decisions involve some error. “The rational choice advocates assume that to predict these errors is difficult or, in the more orthodox conception of rationality, impossible. Tversky’s work rejects this view of decision-making. Tversky and his collaborators show that economic rationality is systematically violated, and that decision-making errors are both widespread and predictable. This now incontestable point was established by two central bodies of work: Tversky and Kahneman’s papers on heuristics and biases, and their papers on framing and prospect theory.”[1]

Much of Tversky and Kahneman’s contributions are less well known by the general public and misinterpreted as a purely theoretical treatment by some risk professionals. As researchers, Tversky and Kahneman were well versed in mathematics, which helped to shine light on systemic errors in complex probability judgments and the use of heuristics in inappropriate context. As groundbreaking as behavioral science has been in challenging economic theory, Tversky and Kahneman’s work centers on a narrow set of heuristics: representativeness, availability and anchoring as universal errors. The authors used these three foundational heuristics broadly to describe how decision-makers substitute mental shortcuts for probabilistic judgments resulting in biased inferences and a lack of rigor in making decisions under uncertainty.[2]

Cognitive Risk Framework: Harnessing Advanced Technology for Decision Support

In the thirty years since Prospect Theory data analytics expertise and computational firepower have made significant progress in addressing the weakness in Bayesian probabilities recognized by Tversky and Kahneman. Additionally, the automotive industry and Apple Inc., among others, have been successful in incorporating behavioral science in product design to reduce risk, anticipate human error and improve the user experience adding value in financial results. This paper assumes that these early examples of progress point to untapped potential if applied in constructive ways. There are distractors, and even Tversky and Kahneman admitted to inherent weaknesses that are not easy to solve. For example, observers are skeptical that laboratory results may not replicate real-life situations; that arbitrary frames don’t reflect reality as well as a lack of mathematical predictive accuracy.

Since Laibson and Zeckhauser’s (1998) critique of Tversky’s contributions to economics a large body of research in cognition has evolved to include Big Data, Computational Neurosciences, Cognitive Informatics, Cognitive Security, Intelligent Informatics, and rapid early stage advancements in machine learning and artificial intelligence. A Cognitive Risk Framework is proposed to leverage the rapid advancement of these technologies in risk management however technology alone is not a panacea. Many of these technologies are evolving yet additional progress will continue in various stages requiring risk professionals to begin to consider how to formalize steps to incorporate these tools into an enterprise risk management program in combination with other human elements.

The Cognitive Risk Framework anticipates that as promising as these new technologies are they represent one pillar of a robust and comprehensive framework for managing increasingly complex threats, such as, cyber and enterprise risks. The Five Pillars include Intentional Controls Design, Intelligence and Active Defense, Cognitive Risk Governance, Cognitive Security Informatics, and Legal “Best Efforts” Considerations. A cognitive risk framework does not supplant other risk frameworks such as COSO ERM, ISO 31000 or NIST standards for managing a range of risks in the enterprise. A cognitive risk framework is presented to leverage the progress made in risk management and provide a pathway to demonstrably enhance enterprise risk using advanced analytics to inform decision-making in ways only now possible. At the core of the framework is an assumption about data.

One of the core tenets of Prospect Theory is the recognition of errors made in decision-making derived from small sample size or poor quality data. Tversky and Kahneman noted several observations where even very skilled researchers routinely made errors of inference derived from poor sampling techniques. Many recognize the importance of data however organizations must anticipate that a cross-disciplinary team of expertise is needed to actualize a cognitive risk framework. Data will become either the engine of a cognitive risk framework or its Achilles Heel and may be the most underestimated investment in ramping up a cognition driven risk program. A cognitive risk framework anticipates much more diverse skills than currently exists in risk management and IT security.

Data is but one of the considerations in developing a robust cognitive risk framework. Other considerations will include developing structure and processes that allow ease of adoption by practitioners across multiple industries and in different size organizations. While it is anticipated that a cognitive risk framework can be successfully implemented in large and small organizations risk professionals may decide to adopt a modified version of the Five Pillars or develop solutions to address specific risks such a cybersecurity as a standalone program. It is anticipated that if cognitive risk frameworks are adopted more broadly that technology firms and standards organizations would take an active role in developing complementary programs to leverage these frameworks to advance enterprise risk using advanced analytics and cognitive elements.

 

 

 

 

 

[1] LAIBSON/ZECKHAUSER Kluwer Journal @ats-ss8/data11/kluwer/journals/risk/v16n1art1 COMPOSED: 03/26/98 11:00 am. PG.POS. 2 SESSION: 15

[2] https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b4ab/dc36dee6df5b3deea53e3b1b911191f67382.pdf

2016-12-02 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground In Cybersecurity

hacker-on-keyboardChristopher P. Skroupa, Contributor to Forbes.com Interviewed James Bone, Executive Director, TheGRCBlueBook on his upcoming book, “Cognitive Hack: The New Battleground in Cybersecurity…the Human Mind”.  In the interview Chris explores the thesis of the book and major trends impacting cyber risk professionals, including topics such as the “Internet of Things” or IoT.  Lastly, James covers why a Cognitive Risk Framework for Cybersecurity is needed and briefly describes the Five Pillars that stand up the Cognitive Risk Framework.  The book is scheduled to be published in the first quarter of 2017

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Chris Skroupa’s bio:

“I focus on the intersection of government, Wall Street & Main Street.”

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

I work with institutional investors and fund managers in the U.S., Europe and Asia on issues involving asset allocation, risk management, corporate governance, active investing and socially responsible investments. I focus on the intersection of government, Wall Street and Main Street. It’s an active crossroad these days as companies and investors address how to bring stakeholders into the discussion of value creation, beyond share price, and through sustainability. I encourage a constructive, solutions-based approach to many hot buttons on the current market agenda.

The author is a Forbes contributor. The opinions expressed are those of the writer.