Monthly Archives: January 2018

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January 20, 2018 by: James Bone Categories: Risk Management Risk Trilogy: A Mechanic, an Artist, and a Scientist walk into a Pub

It is the dead of winter in a lovely little village along the coastline of southern Maine and a sudden Nor’easter pounds New England. To escape the cold and quench their thirst three solitary figures decide to seek refuge in the only Irish pub open that night. Each of these figures has arrived, serendipitously, within 15 minutes of one another and are beginning to warm themselves near the fireplace next to the bar.

As they settle in all three decide to share a pint or two and order food before they depart along their separate journeys. Not surprisingly, one pint leads to another and before long the conversation has traversed solving world events and inevitably leads to their work and avocation.

The first figure pipes up, ”I am a mechanic! I have seven professional certifications and have been taught by master mechanics from around the world.” The second figure interjects, that’s really interesting, “I am an artist! I interpret the complex and make it simple for my audience to understand.” Without hesitation the third figure interrupts and exclaims, “I am a scientist! I research and explore the unknown.”

After several more pints of beer the conversation has grown even more verbose and an argument ensues. The artist asks the mechanic what types of mechanical repairs does she solve and the mechanic responds, “I am a risk mechanic!” I have been certified in all varieties of risks, policies and procedures, and frameworks and speak regularly on the topic around the world, says the mechanic.

At this the scientist asks the artist, “what does it mean that you interpret the complex and make it simple for your audience?” The artist says, “I study how people make decisions and help them manage risks by redesigning their work to solve complex problems!” The mechanic then elbows the artist and asks the scientist, well, what do you study? The scientist proudly explains that she is a researcher of complex risk phenomenon. I have eight patents on this topic.

As the storm outside subsides, the bartender, having overheard the arguments, has decided his three patrons have had enough to drink for one night. The bartender proposes a bet and asks the three to solve a complex risk problem with the winner’s tab paid.

Solve this riddle asks the bartender, “What does a rich man crave but can never buy? We chase it but can never find it. What makes fools of us all?”

 

Do you know the answer?